Newly diagnosed with diabetes

Newly diagnosed with diabetes. Not sure what type because I’ve never looked up the difference. Right now I’m on diet and exercise. No meds. My A1C was a 7. I don’t see the dietician for 2 more weeks and I’m starving. What can I eat? Everything looks so contradictory. Help please.

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One thing I learned right off was nothing white. No white sugar, no white bread, no white rice. In other words trade sugar for stevia or truvia, white bread for whole wheat or dark bread, and white rice for brown rice.
Fiber will help metabolize the sugar from your blood. I eat a lot of oatmeal in the morning. It is also good for your heart.
If you can nuts are a good snack. They are fiber. They are also full of omega 3 which will help lower colesterol and help your heart rate stay regular, especially walnuts. The other thing is nuts help reduce the possibility of having blood clots. Nuts are low in carbohydrates. Nuts are however, high in calories so don’t over do it.
My dr told me 6 small meals are better than 3 great big meals.

  1. Breakfast
  2. Midmorning snack
  3. Lunch
  4. Afternoon snack
  5. Supper
  6. Bedtime snack
    Beleive me it is scary at first and as you learn it is not so bad. You just have to learn what is best for you.
    I hope your dr got you a glucometer to keep track of your blood sugar.
    Exercise will help keep the blood sugar in Check. But be sure your blood sugar is at least 100 mg/dL or you could faint or get sick.
    The dietaishen will probably tell you how to divide your plate.
    Use a 6" plate. Divide it in half. On one half non starchy vegatables, on the other side divide it in half again 1/4 is your meat or protein, the other 1/4 is for your carbohydrates or starchy vegetables.
    Example 1/2 broccoli (non starchy), 1/4 sweet potato (starchy) 1/4 skinless baked or broiled chicken (protine).
    Drink plenty of water it keeps you hydrated and dilutes the sugar in your blood. If your blood sugar is to high you can walk and drink water to bring it down.
    The thing that will help you most right now, I think, is to learn what is starchy and non starchy. Try to avoid fried foods.
    If you want a hamburger it is ok just plan around it. Eat the plate for sure one of your meals. Have oatmeal or something fiber for breakfast.
    I hope this has helped and that I did not over whelm you.
    Another thing go online and look for the American Diabetes Association. They have tons of information that should help you.
    Good luck and stay well.

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I’m doing the same thing as a pre diabetic trying to get my weight and sugar down ugh it’s not easy my husband is with me with the same thing so I tell him if it’s a fruit or vegetable if you need a snack it’s great to also have a hard boiled egg and my doctor agreed fills up the hunger spot with protein and with whole fat stuff it keeps you fill longer

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Thank you very much! No this was not too overwhelming. Trying to process the diagnosis was overwhelming. Lol I truly do appreciate everything you have had to say. You made me leave this post more comfortable than I did leaving the Dr’s office. I love oatmeal, but I like the maple and brown sugar. I’ll have to adjust big time because sugars, pasta, rice, potatoes, and bread are all I eat. I already do grilled/baked skinless meats. I’m not a big meat eater though. I love my veggies. I’m not used to eating more than 2 meals a day though. All the snacking might be a small challenge for me. I’m used to snacking on fruits, carrots, trail mix, nuts, and of course junk. Trying to get a grip on what to eat and how much seems to be the biggest challenge ahead of me. I have back issues, but I’m going to have to deal with it in order to at least get some walking in. I don’t like to stroll, I like to power walk. Needless to say, this is a great start. Thanks again!

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That’s the confusing part for me, no fat, but high in fats is good? I just don’t know anymore.

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If no insulin prescription right away then you are more than likely a type 2 diabetic (insulin resistant) as t2 doesnt require insulin therapy to survive/live unlike a t1 who will eventually die without insulin therapy.

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What you can eat depends on many factors

How insulin resistant you are vs sensitive

Thus a lot of it is trial and error to figure out your personal needs.

In general eating a balance diet is good and getting in 30 minutes a day 7 days a week of cardio helps make your body use what insulin it makes (more is good but again depends on your health).

Food in general needs to be balance as in pairing a carb with a good protein and source of fat that work together.

Eg
PB n slice of bread
Carrots/veggies n hummus
Chicken breast with steamed veggies and sweet potato (served with real butter or other natural healthy fat option)
Omelet with veggies and a slice of toast
Tofu scramble (tofu mixed with various vegetables and served with or without bread)

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Yes all those are good ideas.
With out much information you can’t go wrong with those ideas.
It is a learning process for each one of us. And sometimes we each need diffrent things.

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if you just diagnosed with diabetes and wasn’t born with the disease you are type 2 , type 1 is when you were born with it

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My standard breakfast is an egg white sandwich on a double fiber English muffin with a sausage paddy and Swiss cheese. Lunch is a peanut butter and sugar free strawberry preserves on Killer Dave’s 20 grain bread. Dinner is more difficult and I’m likely to eat whatever the family eats but smaller portions. Exercise is important.

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Not necessarily there are those who develop t2 at a young age and those who’s immune system start attacking at a older age thus either is possible to develop at any age.

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Like all things there are healthy fats and not so healthy fats
Fats from avacado for example are considered good and healthy for you but hydrogenated fats are not (think deep frying oils in excess).

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Depending on medical advice there are chair workouts that you can to aimed at those who are in a wheelchair or have arthritis that are aimed at helping to strengthen the back and core muscles. Might be a option to look into that side of things.

I’m virtually chair bound and do such to keep mobile as able do to other medical on top of being diabetic.

Eating with your family is good everyone can stand to have a health dinner. Eating veggies as snacks isnt bad and is encouraged. I’m vegan so for me I graze on raw vegetables most if the day and meals tend to be steamed/cooked mixed with raw options.

Rice, potatoes etc you can still have you just have to learn which ones spike you the most and modify the amount you can eat. But remember when pairing with a protein and good fat the spike can be evened out or prolonged (it’s why many have issues with pizza).

My favorite meal is lentil stew over steamed white rice - it gives me very little in the way of a spike but for someone else the amount I eat might well spike them so would need lowering to cause a low spike (low spike means only a slight rise in glucose instead of a big jump).

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Figuring carbs read the labels there are 15 carbs in a unit usually 5 to 7 units per meal and 1 or 2 for snack portion size is important. Look up a 1200 calorie diabetic diet on Google. Any fruit, bread, pasta, rice, sweets and starchy foods will have carbs in them. Most green veggies are low in carbs and calories. If you can plan your meals ahead of time. Keep a record of what you eat and your carb intake. Drink lots of water if you have a choice of an orange or orange juice eat the orange. I hope this helps

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True that, but it still t2 , t1 is when you born with it Doctor told me , right

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This truly sucks! I remember when I ended up in hospital for an unrelated matter, and came out on insulin. I was aware of what this meant, as I had been a professional home health aid for years. I had been to diabetes classes with clients. I help with both meal preparation, and medication. Set up. And one thing you need to know. Sometimes the experts are wrong! Not about the eating the right foods thing
Wish they were. But It has been a few years now, but I had been told that the life expectancy of an insulin dependent diabetic is 5 years. This was almost ten years ago! The medical science to control glucose levels is changing and advancing everyday! Yes it isn’t great. I have three years culinary training. Telling me I can live a normal life with diabetes is like telling Charels Lindberg he can live a normal life but can never be more than 25 feet.off the ground again. That said, YOU can do this! You can live a normal life, but what normal means will need to change. But if a.food guy like me can do it, and I have.dietery restrictions because of faith also, so c!n you. It does get
better over time.

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You can eat alot of protein because it doesn’t raise blood pressure levels. If you get the munchies chew on some jerky. It takes you longer to chew and you can enjoy the flavor. Eat more meat than anything else because it doesn’t have carbs and starches in it which raise blood sugar. Cutting back on the other stuff but not completely. I also take collagen with c biotin and Keratin as well as a and e and acidophilus. A good multivitamin helps to. This all keeps your amune system up and helps keep you from feeling hungry. It works for me. And if you just found out that you have diabetes, it’s most likely type 2 because that’s what shows up in later years.
Don’t be afraid because you can still live a long time if you eat right. Those sugar cravings, suck on a piece of sugar free hard candy, it helps alot.

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The best advice i have is get rid of all processed food. Shop only the out side aisles or purchase from farmers who veg, and their meat is grass fed. Check your bs before you eat something then check it at 1 hour and again at 2 hours. The 1hour check should be your spike and the 22hour should be your your starting check.

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High protein, low carb (complex carbs). If you take pills and are not on insulin, then you are type 2. The difference is:

 Type 1 is an autoimmune disease. Your body destroys the cells that make insulin. Since you have no insulin, you must get it by injections.

Type 2; your body still makes insulin but it either doesn’t make enough or it doesn’t work as well as it should. This can usually be managed with pills. If not controlled well with pills (plus diet and exercise), then insulin may be added as well.

 Type 2;
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Actually wheat and rice are poison for diabetics. There are some veggie based alternatives out there like cauliflower.

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